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  Saturday 15th of May 2021 08:15 AM


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Illinois And Wisconsin Disagree On The Most Hated Bug – 1440wrok.com

It's not that our two states don't agree that there are insects that should be hated, it's just that we disagree on which creep-crawly should draw the most disdain.

Let's begin with a little self-examination. Are you cool with bugs, or do they freak you out? It's okay to admit to being bugged by bugs, and please keep in mind that you are far from being alone in feeling that way. I have a bug-phobic daughter, and believe me, the most dangerous place in our home is standing anywhere near an exit if she sees a bug (of nearly any sort) in the room. Move or die has become a family motto.

As I said, being freaked by bugs is very, very common.In Chapman Universitys 2016 Survey on American Fears, 25 percent of respondents said they were afraid of insects and/or spiders. Thats more than the number of people who were afraid of:

TheCut.com, in a piece called "Insects Are Scary Because Your Brain Confuses Disgust With Fear,"offers up the theorythat disgust for bugs brings about something called therejection response. Basically, it's your brain launching an overwhelming feeling that you've just got to get this creepy thing away from you right now.

TheCut.com:

Were disgusted by feces and rotting food, for instance, because each has the potential to make us sick. Along those same lines, the presence of insects often indicates that something isnt safe to consume or touch.Over time, weve come to associate the messenger with the threat itself.

Now that we've covered why some of us (Molly, looking at you) get really freaked out by bugs, let's look at what bugs we hate the most.

PestStrategies.com has a piece up at their website that takes a look at the most hated bugs in America state-by-state. Their survey of about 3,500 people found that there were 6 bugs (I'm including spiders as bugs) that really get to Americans. They are:

Cockroaches are your big winner, or loser, depending on your perspective. Roaches are the most hated bug in 29 states, including our state of Illinois. North of the Cheddar Curtain in Wisconsin, they're hating big-time on the bed bugs. Indiana residents are also down on the bed bugs, while over in Iowa, they have their sights on mosquitoes.

I'm just glad that we haven't had to add Murder Hornets to our list of choices.

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Illinois And Wisconsin Disagree On The Most Hated Bug - 1440wrok.com

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Bed bugs: A home remedy could deter the creepy crawlies from infesting your home – Express

Leaving itchy bite marks on your skin, the thought of these bugs feeding on your flesh at night can creep anybody out. One plant-based essential oil could ward them off.

Known as Cimex Lectularius, according to Pest Smart Control, bed bugs can range from 1mm to 7mm in size.

Notoriously difficult to see, they can hide in the nooks and crannies of a mattress.

One of the best essential oils to deter bed bugs from settling in your bedroom is lemongrass.

Belonging to a small evergreen tree found in Southeast Asia, lemongrass has a citrusy aroma bed bugs can't stand.

Take advantage of lemongrass essential oil by adding a few drops into your washing detergent.

This will help to clear any infestation from your bedding, although there's another technique to get rid of them from your mattress.

Using lemongrass essential oil, mix a few drops with 30ml of water and use this to spray your bedding and mattress.

READ MORE:Bedbugs warning: Possible sounds and smells warning you may be at risk of an infestation

Make sure not to use lemongrass essential oil directly onto your skin, as its high acidity levels will lead to irritation.

Whenever using essential oils, it's best practice to dilute them - not only will they freshen up your home, they will help keep bed bugs at bay.

Other essential oils that can be useful in deterring bed bugs include tea tree, lavender and lemon.

This way, you can choose the fragrance most appealing to you when clearing your home of bed bugs.

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The experts at Pest Smart Control added: "They may not rid the bed bugs instantly, but it is often effective after a couple of tries.

"Not to mention you can bring the beautiful smells of nature into your home at the same time without toxic chemicals."

Entomologist Ameya Gondhalekar from Purdue University, Indiana, USA, identified lemongrass as one of the most effective essential oils for bed bug control.

Published in the journal Scientific Reports, Gondhalekar commented on his findings: "Since bed bugs are found on beds and sofas, people want chemicals that are safe for humans.

"With [lemongrass] essential oils, its compounds are considered to be a low-risk option for bed bug control."

Lemongrass was proven effective to kill bed bugs upon application, but a multidisciplinary approach to eliminate the pests is encouraged.

WebMD suggests using a stiff brush to scrub the mattress seams, and then vacuum the mattress and surrounding areas.

Make sure to place the contents of the vacuum in a bin bag, and to remove the bin bag from the house immediately.

Bed bugs can survive for up to a year without feeding, so it may take a while to discover you have an infestation.

Signs include bed bug faecal material, eggs shells or shed skins where bed bugs hide.

If the infestation is particularly large in numbers, a musty odour will be apparent.

This scent is from the bugs' scent glands, with large numbers needed in order to detect the smell.

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Bed bugs: A home remedy could deter the creepy crawlies from infesting your home - Express

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Rentals, HUD, and Laws About Bed Bug Treatment – Yes Pest …

As bed bug infestations become more common in Columbus and Bloomington, Indiana, landlords should pay special attention to their properties. According to the 2015 Bugs without Borders survey, rental units and condominiums remain the most common places for bed bugs to take up residence. And Indiana state law requires landlords to deliver their premises to tenants in habitable condition. Federal law also requires agents and owners of HUD housing maintain their premises in a decent, safe, sanitary condition. This means if bed bugs, rodents, or other pests invade your property, the propertys owner needs to address it.

Indiana state code IC 32-31-8-5 states A landlord shall do the following: (1) Deliver the rental premises to a tenant in compliance with the rental agreement, and in a safe, clean, and habitable condition. Notice the word deliver. In Indiana, state law does not require landlords to keep their tenants properties in habitable condition; it only requires that landlords deliver their premises in such condition. If a bed bug or other infestation occurs, the landlord is therefore not responsible for eradicating the pests if its stated in the rental agreement that the tenant is responsible for maintaining the property. If, for some reason, the landlord introduced the pests, the responsibility for killing the pests would, of course, fall on the landlord.

For single-tenant rentals, distinguishing who introduced the bed bugs is fairly easy. If there were no bed bugs before a tenant arrived and a year or more later bed bugs infested the premises, its logical to conclude the tenant introduced the pest. However, for multiple-unit rentals, figuring out who introduced a pest becomes problematic.

In multi-unit rentals, tenants are continually coming and going. It can be difficult to pin down who introduced a pest and when. If the landlord cannot prove that an individual tenant introduced bed bugs, it might very well fall on the landlord to hire a professional to kill the pests.

Killing bed bugs in a multi-unit facility without bickering over who introduced them is a good practice, anyway. As a landlord, you do not want a bed bug infestation spreading. An infestation will drive tenants out, and rumor might keep new tenants from moving in, even if the bed bugs are treated.

Landlords will also likely be responsible for paying to destroy bed bugs if there has been a history of bed bugs in a given unit, even if it is a single-tenant dwelling. Bed bugs are notoriously difficult to kill, and they have been growing resistant to insecticides. Sometimes it takes multiple treatments to eradicate a bed bug population.

For these reasons, its important to contact a pest control expert if you suspect an infestation. Professionals know how to identify bed bugs, and they can identify which treatment option will best kill pests in your property.

Federal regulations require more of owners and agents of HUD housing than does the Indiana State Code of landlords. In a 2012 notice, the Acting Assistant Secretary for Housing Carol J. Galante informed HUD owners and agents of their responsibility to treat bed bug infestations.

Notice H 2012-5 states:

Pursuant to 24 CFR Part 5, Subpart G, HUD housing must be decent, safe, sanitary and in good repair. Owners of HUD-insured or assisted housing must maintain such housing in a manner that meets physical condition standards. In accordance with project Regulatory Agreements and Section 8 HAP Contracts, the housing must have no evidence of infestation.

HUD owners are therefore required to take care of bed bug or other pest infestations. This, however, does not necessarily mean that the owner-agent must always foot the bill for extermination. The requirements simply put urgency on addressing the infestation. Who pays for the pest control service is determined by who introduced the pest. As mentioned, it can be difficult to determine who introduced bed bugs in multifamily units.

Because bed bugs are spreading, the notice suggests that HUD owners and agents create an integrated pest management (IPM) plan to prevent infestations before they begin. An IPM plan includes steps to educate tenants, stop infestations before they occur, respond to possible infestations, and following up on treatments.

Many pest control companies also offer pest protection plans, which HUD owners might want to consider. These plans involve regularly scheduled inspections and service, which can prevent infestations before they arise.

Photo courtesy of John Benson, Moving Out.

Addressing bed bug infestations is important because ramifications for ignoring an issue can be severe. For example, tenants might withhold or reduce their rent payment if a landlord does not respond in adequate time. They may also go ahead and hire outside company to conduct service and then deduct the cost from their rent.

Worse, the tenant might contact local authorities if you do not respond in a timely manner. If inspectors then come and find an infestation, they can issue an order for you to fix the problem and penalize your company. Worse, if the problem is pervasive and disturbs tenants ability to live in the building, the tenant can legally move out without notice. At that point, they might file a lawsuit.

When your tenant says, bed bugs, its important to respond without delay. Figure out later who will pay the bill. Protect your property and keep your tenants happy by killing bed bugs before they spread.

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Rentals, HUD, and Laws About Bed Bug Treatment - Yes Pest ...

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Enslaved people’s health was ignored from the country’s beginning, laying the groundwork for today’s health disparities – The Ridgefield Press

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Eric Kyere, IUPUI

(THE CONVERSATION) Some critics of Black Lives Matter say the movement itself is racist. Their frequent counterargument: All lives matter. Lost in that view, however, is a historical perspective. Look back to the late 18th century, to the very beginnings of the U.S., and you will see Black lives in this country did not seem to matter at all.

Foremost among the unrelenting cruelties heaped upon enslaved people was the lack of health care for them. Infants and children fared especially poorly. After childbirth, mothers were forced to return to the fields as soon as possible, often having to leave their infants without care or food. The infant mortality rate was estimated at one time to be as high as 50%. Adult people who were enslaved who showed signs of exhaustion or depression were often beaten.

As a professor of social work, I study ways to stop racism, promote social justice, and help the Black community empower itself. A relationship exists between the health of enslaved Blacks and the making of America.

Racist medical theory

White masters, often brutal and violent, dehumanized the enslaved people who worked for them and became wealthy from their work. Slaveholders justified their treatment by relying on the widely accepted view of Black inferiority and the physical differences between Blacks and whites. Racist medical theory, the racist notion that the blacks were inherently inferior and animal-like who needed maltreatment to be sound for work, was a critical element.

Enslaved people were poorly fed, overworked and overcrowded, which promoted germ transmission. So did their housing bare, cold and windowless, or close to it. Because they were not paid, slaves could not maintain personal hygiene. Clothes went unwashed, baths were infrequent, dental care was limited, and beds remained unclean. Body lice, ringworm and bedbugs were common.

This treatment began in slave dungeons, built by Europeans on the coastal shores of Africa, where enslaved Blacks awaited shipment to the New World. In Ghana, for example, perhaps 200 were cloistered in tiny spaces where they ate, slept, urinated and defecated. Archaeological research has shown the dirt floors were soaked in vomit, urine, feces and menstrual blood. Conditions within the dungeon were so deadly that cleaning them was discouraged; those who tried risked smallpox and intestinal infections.

Sick slaves rarely saw doctors

Diseases among the enslaved people in the colonies and later the states were common and at a disparate rate when compared to whites: typhus, measles, mumps, chicken pox, typhoid and more. Only as a last resort did the slave owner bring in a doctor. Instead, the white master and his wife would provide the health care, though rarely were either one trained physicians. Older enslaved women also helped, and brought their knowledge of herbs, roots, plants and midwifery from Africa to the Americas. As with everything else, Blacks had no say about their care. And if a doctor was involved, Black patients were not necessarily told anything about their condition. The medical report went directly to the slave owner.

Black women played multiple roles. Of course, they were part of the labor force. And they took care of the sick. But they were also the machinery for producing more black bodies. After the mid-Atlantic slave trade was banned, slave owners needed a new source of labor. A pregnant enslaved woman provided that possibility. The birth of a baby born into slavery meant profits that potentially lasted generations, a product requiring little investment.

Terrifying medical research

Some of the Black women were used in medical experiments; much of the research, some conducted without anesthesia, focused on maternal health. As the white scientists inflicted tremendous pain on the pregnant women, the infants being carried sometimes died. Through the torture of these enslaved women, many white physicians and white medical institutions gained considerable fame and wealth.

Adverse health consequences for Blacks facilitated the establishment of some medical advances, such as the invention of the speculum for gynecological exams. One enslaved woman reportedly endured 30 gynecological surgeries without anesthesia. Medical interests and also economic and political interests were served.

More than 150 years later, the health disparities of Black and white Americans remain. To fix what is wrong today, an understanding of the inequities of the past is an imperative. Only then can we begin to dismantle the structural racism that is replete within the American system. Knowledge of the history is necessary to explore and identify the underlying mechanisms to understand how racism revives itself to continue to produce health disparities, and ways to interrupt it.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/enslaved-peoples-health-was-ignored-from-the-countrys-beginning-laying-the-groundwork-for-todays-health-disparities-143339.

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Enslaved people's health was ignored from the country's beginning, laying the groundwork for today's health disparities - The Ridgefield Press

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Enslaved people’s health was ignored from the country’s beginning, laying the groundwork for today’s health disparities – Jacksonville Journal-Courier

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Eric Kyere, IUPUI

(THE CONVERSATION) Some critics of Black Lives Matter say the movement itself is racist. Their frequent counterargument: All lives matter. Lost in that view, however, is a historical perspective. Look back to the late 18th century, to the very beginnings of the U.S., and you will see Black lives in this country did not seem to matter at all.

Foremost among the unrelenting cruelties heaped upon enslaved people was the lack of health care for them. Infants and children fared especially poorly. After childbirth, mothers were forced to return to the fields as soon as possible, often having to leave their infants without care or food. The infant mortality rate was estimated at one time to be as high as 50%. Adult people who were enslaved who showed signs of exhaustion or depression were often beaten.

As a professor of social work, I study ways to stop racism, promote social justice, and help the Black community empower itself. A relationship exists between the health of enslaved Blacks and the making of America.

Racist medical theory

White masters, often brutal and violent, dehumanized the enslaved people who worked for them and became wealthy from their work. Slaveholders justified their treatment by relying on the widely accepted view of Black inferiority and the physical differences between Blacks and whites. Racist medical theory, the racist notion that the blacks were inherently inferior and animal-like who needed maltreatment to be sound for work, was a critical element.

Enslaved people were poorly fed, overworked and overcrowded, which promoted germ transmission. So did their housing bare, cold and windowless, or close to it. Because they were not paid, slaves could not maintain personal hygiene. Clothes went unwashed, baths were infrequent, dental care was limited, and beds remained unclean. Body lice, ringworm and bedbugs were common.

This treatment began in slave dungeons, built by Europeans on the coastal shores of Africa, where enslaved Blacks awaited shipment to the New World. In Ghana, for example, perhaps 200 were cloistered in tiny spaces where they ate, slept, urinated and defecated. Archaeological research has shown the dirt floors were soaked in vomit, urine, feces and menstrual blood. Conditions within the dungeon were so deadly that cleaning them was discouraged; those who tried risked smallpox and intestinal infections.

Sick slaves rarely saw doctors

Diseases among the enslaved people in the colonies and later the states were common and at a disparate rate when compared to whites: typhus, measles, mumps, chicken pox, typhoid and more. Only as a last resort did the slave owner bring in a doctor. Instead, the white master and his wife would provide the health care, though rarely were either one trained physicians. Older enslaved women also helped, and brought their knowledge of herbs, roots, plants and midwifery from Africa to the Americas. As with everything else, Blacks had no say about their care. And if a doctor was involved, Black patients were not necessarily told anything about their condition. The medical report went directly to the slave owner.

Black women played multiple roles. Of course, they were part of the labor force. And they took care of the sick. But they were also the machinery for producing more black bodies. After the mid-Atlantic slave trade was banned, slave owners needed a new source of labor. A pregnant enslaved woman provided that possibility. The birth of a baby born into slavery meant profits that potentially lasted generations, a product requiring little investment.

Terrifying medical research

Some of the Black women were used in medical experiments; much of the research, some conducted without anesthesia, focused on maternal health. As the white scientists inflicted tremendous pain on the pregnant women, the infants being carried sometimes died. Through the torture of these enslaved women, many white physicians and white medical institutions gained considerable fame and wealth.

Adverse health consequences for Blacks facilitated the establishment of some medical advances, such as the invention of the speculum for gynecological exams. One enslaved woman reportedly endured 30 gynecological surgeries without anesthesia. Medical interests and also economic and political interests were served.

More than 150 years later, the health disparities of Black and white Americans remain. To fix what is wrong today, an understanding of the inequities of the past is an imperative. Only then can we begin to dismantle the structural racism that is replete within the American system. Knowledge of the history is necessary to explore and identify the underlying mechanisms to understand how racism revives itself to continue to produce health disparities, and ways to interrupt it.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: https://theconversation.com/enslaved-peoples-health-was-ignored-from-the-countrys-beginning-laying-the-groundwork-for-todays-health-disparities-143339.

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Enslaved people's health was ignored from the country's beginning, laying the groundwork for today's health disparities - Jacksonville Journal-Courier

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